A great way to update your kitchen doesn’t have to involve hefty tools or paint brushes. Sometimes, all a kitchen may need is a thorough deep clean to look like new. Think beyond the dirty dishes. Are there areas of your kitchen that you tend to neglect? It’s a good idea to give your kitchen a deep clean at least twice a year. Here are some areas you may want to consider:
The homeowners replaced the awkward upper cabinets with shelving that makes the most of the kitchen's pitched ceiling. They also ditched the lower cabinets for freestanding components, including a stainless steel rolling island and a mango-wood Crate & Barrel console fitted with a marble top. A red Aga gas stove offers a serious upgrade over the old electric model.

Once you get beyond $20,000, your wish list is almost endless (without going crazy). After replacing all counters and refacing or installing new cabinets, focus on the flooring, backsplash and island. If you don’t have a kitchen island, go out and find a kitchen pro to add one right away. They are becoming a staple in kitchens across the country. They not only add a new and improved design feature, but also improves your storage and expands your seating.


Professional kitchen designers charge $100 to $200 per hour. Though the NKBA suggests four percent of your budget will go to design fees, this shoots up to closer to 10 percent when you hire a certified professional on-site. If you get advice or an in-home consultation from a materials and design store, it will certainly stay in the range of a $100 to $800 flat fee. However, homeowners report paying $3,500 to $18,500 for certified professionals and independent services. At this rate, you might expect such services as:

Building a budget should be your number one concern when planning a kitchen remodel. It determines how much you can accomplish, the materials available, how much professional help you’ll need, and what the final product will look like, among other aspects. If you don't plan appropriately, there's a good chance that you will find yourself in debt by the end of the project or left with a half-finished space after the funds run out.
While home equity loans and HELOCs can come with low interest rates and fair terms, it’s important to understand that not everyone qualifies. According to the FTC, you can typically borrow only up to 85 percent of your home’s value with a first mortgage and second loan, for example. This makes home equity products a poor option for anyone who has been a homeowner for a short time and doesn’t have a lot of equity built up.

For those looking to remodel their kitchen within a tight budget there are several options including using an inexpensive countertop material like butcher block, refacing existing cabinets, adding new paint to existing cabinets, replacing existing floors with a laminate or other affordable material. And a fresh paint job can do wonders to refresh a kitchen. Using particleboard instead of plywood where it won’t be seen, doing the demolition of the kitchen yourself and other money-savers can help you get the kitchen of your dreams but without going into debt to do it.
Plan ahead and determine whether you need to upgrade your electrical board to accommodate a new refrigerator or oven -- which can be $1,000. You may also need to move outlets and fixtures to accommodate a new layout. Plus, you may have outdated outlets that need replacement -- adding $175 to your total. Have an electrician on hand to guide you through the process and be ready to spend about 5 percent of your total on electrical work. 
Sadly, most home remodeling projects do not return 100% of your investment. In fact, according to Remodeling’s 2017 Cost Vs. Value report, only one project will return a positive investment (attic insulation). Nonetheless, that doesn’t mean you should skip all remodeling projects. After all, if you plan to live in your house for another 10 years, you will enjoy those long overdue upgrades. You’ll get a higher sale price down the line and a higher quality of life living with a remodeled kitchen.
When you're working with $15,000 to $30,000, you can leave more work to the professionals instead of doing it yourself. This might include refinishing or refacing your cabinets, painting the walls and ceilings, installing new lighting and rewiring some electrical work. You can also focus on replacing your flooring, if it's particularly worn, and look at more high-grade countertop material like stone (granite, Corian, Formica). You might be able to invest in custom cabinets, move some plumbing, or have an island installed in this price range, but you might have to compromise on other upgrades in the process.
During a kitchen remodel, you can also decide whether it makes sense to hide small appliances in cabinets or display them on the countertop. Another storage option is a new pantry, which can help you and your family stay organized. You may also want to consider having a kitchen island, with its own set of storage cabinets or shelves. Islands can also provide additional countertop and seating space.
Try not to stay in your home while the work is going on unless you have a second kitchen in the house. You will not be able to cook or eat in there for 3–8 weeks if the remodel is a big one. If you have no choice but to stay, talk to the contractor about isolating the work area and controlling the airflow. Remodeling dust can damage the lungs and cause short- and long-term health problems. Verify the contractor stop and start times, walk-through dates, vacation days, etc.
"Brass offers a classic and timeless look while still feeling bold and contemporary," says Amy Biller Switzer, marketing manager at Emtek and Schaub. "We will see that continue into 2020." The finish blends nicely with most kitchen design styles, but we especially love the look of brass hardware against dark, moody cabinetry or a polished brass faucet that acts as a shiny focal point in a neutral kitchen.  
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