Building a budget should be your number one concern when planning a kitchen remodel. It determines how much you can accomplish, the materials available, how much professional help you’ll need, and what the final product will look like, among other aspects. If you don't plan appropriately, there's a good chance that you will find yourself in debt by the end of the project or left with a half-finished space after the funds run out.

You can remove walls and cabinetry if you have the space and the budget to do it. You can even combine this space with the dining room for one large, unified area, instead of having a bar or tall wall separate the two. If you live in a condo, check building codes to make sure you can knock out walls. Also, consult with a contractor, as they could recognize that the wall is connected to a supporting beam.
A huge part of a kitchen remodel expense involves appliances. Can you keep any of your current appliances? Doing so will save you thousands of dollars, no joke. I’m sticking with stainless appliances, a new stainless sink, and my Delta faucet (which I love, and it’s fun to watch guests try and figure out how to turn on). All of my appliances work perfectly fine, but we are getting a new refrigerator and stove. Because of my job we really need two refrigerators and I splurged on a double oven range since I couldn’t fit double ovens anywhere without sacrificing cabinets.
When the goal is rustic simplicity, there's no need to spend tons on custom cabinetry and granite counters. Paint transformed oak cabinets, bought off the rack at Lowe's and topped with Ikea's birch slabs, while the same white semigloss brightened stools from Walmart. An old tablecloth was used as a skirt for the farmhouse sink, and classic glass cannisters, also Walmart finds, were used for storage instead of upper cabinets.
Home remodeling superstores carry a great selection of door hardware.  Choose knobs and pulls that complement your architectural style, and don’t cut corners. This is what I call a brooch – an added touch that makes the whole room work! Also, remove and replace any old painted-over hinges with shiny new ones. It is time consuming, but very inexpensive. And it makes a huge difference.
Before any remodel, everyone has a rough idea of what they want the final product to be. Sadly, we can’t always see an exact replica of what we have on our mind. Therefore, when you see a kitchen design, appliance or layout you like, take a picture, save a pin or do whatever you can to not lose that image. If you’re meeting with a kitchen designer, show them everything you saved. It will undoubtedly make the process much easier.

Most homeowners spend between $12,800 and $21,200 for the average kitchen renovation. The lower end of this spectrum covers smaller projects, such as refacing cabinets, installing a backsplash, painting, etc. In comparison, renovations that cost $30,000+ typically involve the introduction of hardwood flooring, high-end appliances, and custom features.


Keeping your existing kitchen appliances can save you money in the short-term. If your stove, oven, dishwasher or fridge isn't Energy Star-certified, however, you should consider upgrading them. Energy-efficient appliances pay for themselves over time by lowering your utility bills, and they help to preserve the environment, too. Additional electrical rewiring may be required to accommodate Energy Star appliances.
If you decide to do a major change and rearrange your appliances, you will have to relocate the pipes. This often involves getting new pipes – installing additional pipes costs about $1,100 – and connecting them to the main line. This also means spending more on labor and, in some cases, hiring a plumber. Plus, you might have to get a permit from the city. These building permits could cost up to $800 if your contractor gets it for you.

The time it takes to remodel your kitchen depends on the size of your project, the amount of work needed, and product lead times. The process can take anywhere from a few weeks to a few months, averaging 2-3 weeks for a small project and 4-12 weeks for a larger, more complex project. These time estimates include the ordering and delivery of your custom products. During your site verification, ask our qualified kitchen contractor how long your project should take.
If you’re in the Sacramento area, you might recognize the name Kitchen Mart, Inc. They’ve been around for over 30 years and they handle everything on your remodel, from design to demolition to installation. I pretty much hired them and they handle it all. They have no subcontractors – everything is in house – so you know it’s going to get done on time and on budget. They do everything from cabinet refacing to custom cabinetry, full service countertop fabrication, and they work with you to find the design you want. (Pssst, they do bathrooms too!)
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