Think about how you can function without a working kitchen. Utilize small appliances and keep your pantry stocked with nonperishable grab-and-go items. Use biodegradable plates, cups, and utensils since you won’t have a working dishwasher. Take advantage of a grill or outdoor cooking area if you have one. You may also want to consider eating out with family or friends more often. Being prepared ahead of time will greatly alleviate any stress you may have without a functioning kitchen during the remodel.
Once you have an idea of your kitchen remodel budget, play around with a loan calculator to figure out your next move. Determine how much your monthly payment may be considering your credit score, how much you borrow and how long you are willing to pay your loan. Also consider how your new monthly payment will affect your monthly cash flow and personal finances overall.
If a total kitchen transformation is what you’re after, it’s time to redo your flooring. Many choices are available nowadays. And if you’re looking for a durable, easy-to-clean option and love the traditional appeal of hardwood, consider a wood-look alternative such as vinyl or this glazed ceramic tile, which you can also use on the wall as a rustic backsplash.
Most homeowners spend between $12,800 and $21,200 for the average kitchen renovation. The lower end of this spectrum covers smaller projects, such as refacing cabinets, installing a backsplash, painting, etc. In comparison, renovations that cost $30,000+ typically involve the introduction of hardwood flooring, high-end appliances, and custom features.
Installing kitchen appliances costs $100 to $300 per appliance on average. Investing in higher quality stoves, dishwashers or refrigerators will certainly drive up your total price. However, if you want to improve your home’s value, it will pay to install higher quality products. There are various options to choose from, including EnergyStar-certified, custom built-in, high-end store bought and budget outlet products. If longevity is important to you, look for products with longer life expectancies.
There's a lot to love about this kitchen designed by Arent & Pyke, but we're particularly impressed by the careful, asymmetrical balance happening here. The hood leans to the right of the room, as do the bar stools, which is subtlety reflected in the cream lumbar pillow camouflaging into the sofa. Meanwhile, the linear floating shelf in line with the hood as well as the light fixture, island counter, and sofa form a soothing sense of symmetry.

Speaking of sale price, your expected date of sale has an effect on your total cost. Like I said above, if you plan on living in the home for a long time, don’t be afraid to splurge. After all, this is your kitchen, one of the most trafficked rooms in any house. However, if you plan on selling your house in the near future, say less than three years after the remodel, don’t go crazy with your kitchen renovation.
If you decide to go with a major remodel and spend upwards of $50,000, you should consider consulting a kitchen designer. A professional designer has the experience, connections and examples to suggest what fits with your plan. He or she can also help you save where possible, so you don't spend needlessly while still getting the final product you want.

When you're working with $15,000 to $30,000, you can leave more work to the professionals instead of doing it yourself. This might include refinishing or refacing your cabinets, painting the walls and ceilings, installing new lighting and rewiring some electrical work. You can also focus on replacing your flooring, if it's particularly worn, and look at more high-grade countertop material like stone (granite, Corian, Formica). You might be able to invest in custom cabinets, move some plumbing, or have an island installed in this price range, but you might have to compromise on other upgrades in the process.
Try not to stay in your home while the work is going on unless you have a second kitchen in the house. You will not be able to cook or eat in there for 3–8 weeks if the remodel is a big one. If you have no choice but to stay, talk to the contractor about isolating the work area and controlling the airflow. Remodeling dust can damage the lungs and cause short- and long-term health problems. Verify the contractor stop and start times, walk-through dates, vacation days, etc.
Then there's the cost of flooring, which is between $1,400 to $5,000 and highly dependent on the material selected and the overall square footage. While vinyl is an excellent option in terms of affordability, it does not add much value to a home. In comparison, granite and hardwood flooring will increase value, but at a higher cost. While wood floors are popular, most remodelers don’t recommend having them in your kitchen because they are so susceptible to moisture.
Older homes typically don’t have enough amps to handle modern demand. Any new work will need to be wired with a new meter, paneling and piping, which can cost $1,000+ to bring it up from the older 60 amps to the modern 200 amps or more. If you move appliances to other parts of the kitchen or install new lighting anywhere no lights have been before, this cost will be factored in. You’ll probably also need new outlets at an average price of $150.
The cost of flooring depends on whether you're replacing a few cracked tiles or doing a complete overhaul of your existing flooring. If you're opting for the latter, the price will depend on your kitchen's square footage and the flooring material you've chosen. Vinyl is generally the most affordable option. While ceramic tile, laminate, cork and hardwood tend to cost more, they can also increase your home's value.
While home equity loans and HELOCs can come with low interest rates and fair terms, it’s important to understand that not everyone qualifies. According to the FTC, you can typically borrow only up to 85 percent of your home’s value with a first mortgage and second loan, for example. This makes home equity products a poor option for anyone who has been a homeowner for a short time and doesn’t have a lot of equity built up.
I had countertops installed the Saturday before Christmas. They arrived at 5:00 in the evening. The top was two sections of cabinets. The one section arrived with a small chip on the edge. The other section had a small chip at the seem which they just filled with epoxy. They dropped glue on my newly installed floor as well as outside. The product they used to clean when done splashed on my newly painted wall and won’t come off. Now the wall has to be repainted which means buying more expensive paint. There was a long rust colored line on the edge of the countertop that won’t come off. Nowhere else does that color appear. There is a caulk joint of about a 1/4 inch between the top of the cabinet and underside of top. Cabinet was level so don’t understand the need for the caulk. We like our choice of color and the looks of our tops. Our issue is with the installation. Would not recommend. Read less

Case in point: Photographer and designer Erin Kestenbaum transformed her kitchen as part of this fall’s One Room Challenge and thoughtfully included enhanced storage space. Kestenbaum’s creative solutions included vertical tray storage above the fridge, a narrow drawer for oils and spices by the range, and a coffee bar built into a full-height cabinet. "I love designing upfront ways to hide the clutter and appliances that, without a home, will inevitably end up on your countertop occupying space," she says. 
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