While most people do not realize this, dishwashers are much more energy efficient than washing dishes by hand. Individuals use too much water and soap when washing their dishes by hand. Dishwashers have been proven to save about 5,000 gallons of water each year and up to $40 on utility bills. This equates to a savings of over $400 during the average life of a dishwasher. Because this easily falls within the average price range of purchasing a dishwasher, it is possible to break even on a dishwasher at the end of its life cycle. 
Once you get beyond $20,000, your wish list is almost endless (without going crazy). After replacing all counters and refacing or installing new cabinets, focus on the flooring, backsplash and island. If you don’t have a kitchen island, go out and find a kitchen pro to add one right away. They are becoming a staple in kitchens across the country. They not only add a new and improved design feature, but also improves your storage and expands your seating.
Speaking of sale price, your expected date of sale has an effect on your total cost. Like I said above, if you plan on living in the home for a long time, don’t be afraid to splurge. After all, this is your kitchen, one of the most trafficked rooms in any house. However, if you plan on selling your house in the near future, say less than three years after the remodel, don’t go crazy with your kitchen renovation.
As you would expect, seamless materials, such as granite, are more durable and more costly. In comparison, you can opt for materials that add less value, such as concrete, to keep your costs down. Whether you choose wood, marble, quartz, or limestone, you can expect to pay an average rate between $2,000 and $4,500 to install the countertops of your choosing.
Then there's the cost of flooring, which is between $1,400 to $5,000 and highly dependent on the material selected and the overall square footage. While vinyl is an excellent option in terms of affordability, it does not add much value to a home. In comparison, granite and hardwood flooring will increase value, but at a higher cost. While wood floors are popular, most remodelers don’t recommend having them in your kitchen because they are so susceptible to moisture.
Consider narrower cabinets, because most people don’t use the space at the back of cabinets, you can get cabinets that aren’t as deep but are better designed for full access—with pull-out baskets, spice drawers, sectioned drawers, corner cabinet carousels, etc. Fill an extra space with narrow filler cabinets with sliders. Consider reducing a double sink to a single for more workspace as well.
Part of determining that price of your kitchen remodel is the extent of your makeover. Your biggest cost investment for a kitchen remodel will usually be cabinets, which typically eat up 25 percent of your budget. Going budget-friendly on your kitchen cabinets at Ikea or a big box retail shop can save a huge amount of money. On-trend hardware in brass, for instance, stands up better to wear and tear and can give cheaper cabinets a more custom, expensive look. By the same token, splurging on a quality faucet but not necessarily buying a super expensive sink can also make a big difference in your overall remodel budget. You can also add custom doors to standard cabinet boxes to give a more custom look. And instead of spending money on custom features like pot or recycling organizers inside your cabinets, consider using customizable organizers purchased at retail stores to keep your cabinets neat at a lower cost.
Remember that the above numbers are averages. Just because most homeowners spend nearly 30% of their budget on cabinetry and hardware, that doesn’t mean you have to as well. If you think your floors are in really bad shape, spend more there. Even if you’re completely renovating your kitchen, you must spend and distribute your budget wisely. To ensure you’re putting your money where it needs to be, continue reading below.
Additionally, personal taste will increase or decrease the total cost of your kitchen remodel.  Some of us have expensive taste while others are content with inexpensive solutions such as laminate counters or plain white walls. Furthermore, as time moves on, more and more homeowners are opting for modern touches, which of course come with a higher price tag. Traditional kitchens are still very popular, but they also tend to be less expensive than modern designs. Needless to say, whether it’s the counters, appliances, dishwasher or cabinets, your personal taste will alter your kitchen renovation cost. 
Speaking of sale price, your expected date of sale has an effect on your total cost. Like I said above, if you plan on living in the home for a long time, don’t be afraid to splurge. After all, this is your kitchen, one of the most trafficked rooms in any house. However, if you plan on selling your house in the near future, say less than three years after the remodel, don’t go crazy with your kitchen renovation.
When the goal is rustic simplicity, there's no need to spend tons on custom cabinetry and granite counters. Paint transformed oak cabinets, bought off the rack at Lowe's and topped with Ikea's birch slabs, while the same white semigloss brightened stools from Walmart. An old tablecloth was used as a skirt for the farmhouse sink, and classic glass cannisters, also Walmart finds, were used for storage instead of upper cabinets.
Case in point: Photographer and designer Erin Kestenbaum transformed her kitchen as part of this fall’s One Room Challenge and thoughtfully included enhanced storage space. Kestenbaum’s creative solutions included vertical tray storage above the fridge, a narrow drawer for oils and spices by the range, and a coffee bar built into a full-height cabinet. "I love designing upfront ways to hide the clutter and appliances that, without a home, will inevitably end up on your countertop occupying space," she says. 
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