Installing new appliances costs between $100 to $300 per appliance on average. By installing higher quality appliances, you can instantly improve your home's value. If you’ve been thinking of keeping your older appliances, keep in mind that most kitchen appliances only last 10-12 years and can cost $250-$500 to repair; and you might end up saving more money by replacing them with warrantied, newer models now. Newer stainless steel appliances are smudge free, and there are many options available, including:

Be Smart About Countertops: Selecting and purchasing new countertops is a big project, but there are ways to simplify the process. If you want new counters, but are worried about how much they cost, then consider materials that look nice but don’t come with a high price tag. Installing ceramic tile is a great choice for a budget-friendly kitchen countertop.
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Once you get beyond $20,000, your wish list is almost endless (without going crazy). After replacing all counters and refacing or installing new cabinets, focus on the flooring, backsplash and island. If you don’t have a kitchen island, go out and find a kitchen pro to add one right away. They are becoming a staple in kitchens across the country. They not only add a new and improved design feature, but also improves your storage and expands your seating.


Maintaining your existing plumbing is an excellent way to reduce costs. You can still invest in new appliances, sinks and faucets as long as you install them in the current plumbing positions. If your remodeling design requires the installation of new pipes or you're changing your kitchen's floor plan, be prepared to pay a plumber for labor and the necessary plumbing parts.
If there is one thing I’m good at, it’s planning for something. Since I’m not doing much for the actual remodel, all of my planning is going towards figuring out how to work, bake, and eat for 6 weeks without a kitchen. I’ve set up two staging areas: one for work/baking and one for everything else. My house is a disaster. Tomorrow we are going to grill an the contents of our local Costco to freeze for quick meals. I ordered a toaster oven for baking and our refrigerator is in the garage in it’s new (permanent) placement. I’ll keep you posted. Two dumpsters are sitting in my driveway and demo starts Monday. Wish me luck!! 🙂
Update Your Cabinets & Paint: Not replacing, but updating, refacing or refinishing your kitchen cabinets are all projects that’ll make your kitchen look better without breaking the bank. As you know, your cabinets take up a lot of real estate in your kitchen and set the tone for the rest of the room. A fresh coat of paint, both on the cabinets and the surrounding walls will do the trick.

Speaking of sale price, your expected date of sale has an effect on your total cost. Like I said above, if you plan on living in the home for a long time, don’t be afraid to splurge. After all, this is your kitchen, one of the most trafficked rooms in any house. However, if you plan on selling your house in the near future, say less than three years after the remodel, don’t go crazy with your kitchen renovation.
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